What Is The Step After Evaporation?

What are the 5 steps of the water cycle?

Many processes work together to keep Earth’s water moving in a cycle.

There are five processes at work in the hydrologic cycle: condensation, precipitation, infiltration, runoff, and evapotranspiration..

What is water cycle for Class 9?

The process in which water evaporates and falls on the land as rain and later flows back into the sea via rivers is called water cycle. 1)Water evaporates from hydrosphere(oceans, seas, river, lakes, ponds)with sun’s heat and form clouds.

How can evaporation be prevented?

Cool the water down or limit its exposure to heat by keeping it in the shade, adding ice or cooling with refrigerated pipes. This lowers the kinetic energy available to the water molecules, which slows the evaporation rate.

What comes first condensation or evaporation?

Lesson Summary Next, it moves through evaporation, or the process by which water is converted from its liquid state to a gaseous state called water vapor. This is followed by condensation, which is the process by which water vapor is changed back into liquid water.

What is 7th water cycle?

Water cycle is the cyclic movement of water from the atmosphere to the earth and back to the atmosphere through various processes. … Condensation: Water vapor rises up and condenses on dust particles to form cloud. Precipitation: Water stored in clouds reaches the ground in the form of rain, hail or snow.

How soil is formed Class 9?

Answer: Soil is formed by breaking down of rocks at or near the surface of the Earth through various physical, chemical, and biological processes by various factors such as the sun, water, wind, and living organisms. … These cracks lead to the breaking up of huge rocks into smaller pieces.

What are the steps of evaporation?

There are four main stages in the water cycle. They are evaporation, condensation, precipitation and collection. Let’s look at each of these stages. Evaporation: This is when warmth from the sun causes water from oceans, lakes, streams, ice and soils to rise into the air and turn into water vapour (gas).

What is evaporation with example?

Evaporation is defined as the process in which the state of water from liquid to gaseous or to vapour state takes place. The rate of evaporation is dependent on the temperature. … The melting of an ice cube is an example of evaporation.

What is water cycle explain with diagram?

The Sun, which drives the water cycle, heats water in oceans and seas. Water evaporates as water vapour into the air. When the water vapour rises, it starts cooling. The water vapour condenses causing the formation of droplets of water.

How is rain caused Class 9?

Rain is formed by evaporation and condensation of water through water cycle. Acid rain is caused by the release of the gases like SO2 (sulphur dioxide) and NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) released from the emission of vehicles and combustion of fuels. These gases dissolve in rain water to form nitric acid and sulphuric acid.

What is the result of evaporation?

When evaporation occurs, the energy removed from the vaporized liquid will reduce the temperature of the liquid, resulting in evaporative cooling. … Evaporation of water occurs when the surface of the liquid is exposed, allowing molecules to escape and form water vapor; this vapor can then rise up and form clouds.

What is evaporation short answer?

Evaporation is the process of a substance in a liquid state changing to a gaseous state due to an increase in temperature and/or pressure. Evaporation is a fundamental part of the water cycle and is constantly occurring throughout nature.

What is water cycle with diagram?

It is also known as the hydrological cycle or the hydrologic cycle. During the process of the water cycle between the earth and the atmosphere, water changes into three states of matter – solid, liquid and gas. The diagram of the water cycle is useful for both Class 9 and 10.

How can you prevent evaporation in a lake?

Top 3 Methods of Reducing EvaporationBy Keeping Free Water Surface Area Minimum: Reservoirs and lakes are the water bodies with large surface area. … By Spreading Surface Films on the Reservoirs and Lakes: … By Providing Mulch on the Land Surfaces:

Does parafilm prevent evaporation?

It prevents evaporation and dissemination of odors, a quality that makes Parafilm invaluable for refrigerated storage of materials. It is resistant to many chemicals and is available in four sizes.

What are the 4 main processes of the water cycle?

Of the many processes involved in the water cycle, the most important are evaporation, transpiration, condensation, precipitation, and runoff.

What are the 7 steps of water cycle?

Hence it is quite important to understand and learn the processes of the water cycle.Step 1: Evaporation. The water cycle starts with evaporation. … Step 2: Condensation. … Step 3: Sublimation. … Step 4: Precipitation. … Step 5: Transpiration. … Step 6: Runoff. … Step 7: Infiltration.

What is water cycle in short?

The Short Answer: The water cycle is the path that all water follows as it moves around Earth in different states. Liquid water is found in oceans, rivers, lakes—and even underground. … Water vapor—a gas—is found in Earth’s atmosphere.

What is water cycle explain?

The water cycle shows the continuous movement of water within the Earth and atmosphere. … Liquid water evaporates into water vapor, condenses to form clouds, and precipitates back to earth in the form of rain and snow. Water in different phases moves through the atmosphere (transportation).

What is water or hydrological cycle?

The water cycle , also known as the hydrologic cycle, describes the continuous movement of water as it makes a circuit from the oceans to the atmosphere to the Earth and on again. Most of Earth’s water is in the oceans. The sun, which drives the water cycle, heats water in the oceans.

At what temperature does water stop evaporating?

Heat (energy) is necessary for evaporation to occur. Energy is used to break the bonds that hold water molecules together, which is why water easily evaporates at the boiling point (212° F, 100° C) but evaporates much more slowly at the freezing point.